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The Collections:
Parker-Hore

The Parker-Hore Archive Collection of Watercolours of Paving-tiles
held in Worcester and in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford
County/Country = Gloucestershire AND Town/Village = Gloucester
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2 of 118 Record
County: Gloucestershire Click on Image to see original watercolour
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Town/Village: Gloucester
Place Details: Cathedral
Artist and Date: A W Franks 1849 August
Iconography: Inscription
Copied from (Collection): Soc of Antiq Bp C p 108
Watercolour Ref. No.: G002B
Notebook: FMP  
Portfolio: Jas P,  
Notebook: IH 2
Other details: Foot of sedilia, near altar. Raised and sunk. Glazed yellow all over. First line letters sunk, second raised, third sunk, fourth and fifth raised. Gentleman's Magazine volume CCXI 1861 p 66. Tracing corrected slightly after Gentleman's Magazine Illustration (Irene Hore). Gentleman's Magazine Volume CCXI p 66 July 1861 (see Gloucester Envelope) Cabalistic Lore. Mr. Urban I beg to send you a drawing of an encaustic tile from Gloucester Cathedral. It is to be seen at the foot of the subsellia, on the south side of where the high altar stood. Croys [qu. For croix or croyez] Crist [Christ] me spede [speed] ame [amen] `The cross of Christ me speed, amen' The cross is once written and twice represented on this tile. The arrangement is singular, the letters on the first line being sunk, on the second raised, on the third sunk, on the fourth and fifth raised. To conceive that the cross patee does duty here as an abbreviation over `ame' as a crown did frequently during the latter half of the 15th century. I think the date of the tile may be of the 14th century. The light are raised portions, the dark the reverse. May not this legend be considered cabalistic or talismanic, as a charm against the evil eye or the like? In connexion with this subject I may mention, that in the Cathedral library is a small book of sermons that belonged to the old abbey of St Peter's. At the end, on a fly leaf, verso side, is read, (?written Irene Hore) in a later hand than the body of the book, a charm for man and beast: `Write this verse bothe for\man and beaste write\for a mane upon chese\for a beaste appell\+ Leo+ fortis + desinct+q oscrit+\write this verse bothe for\swine and dogge write\for swine upon appells&\for doggs uppon chese and \ for a horse uppon a criste\of breade and so that the \crosses doe stande right one\ under an other as they doe\here. `Twa+ nare+frare+nare +Qua + rare + prare+ nare ' May 20 1861 J.D.J.N.
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Copyright of this digital resource will be held jointly by
the Ashmolean Museum, Worcester City Museum & Art Gallery and by the Worcestershire Archaeological Society.
Copyright of the original drawings is held by
the Ashmolean Museum and by the Worcestershire Archaeological Society respectively.
11-Dec-2017>
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